After Note:

The 4D model of Vought F4U Corsair. 

Pay attention at: The top part/tail-fuselage. Make sure of symmetrical in the constructions, which can cause tail-wing alignment.


For the main wing construction, for the better shaping, DO NOT GLUE MAIN WING IN ONE STEP. First glue the "downward part" of the main wing, then the "upward part" of the main wing, as shown.   


Fly very well. The adjusted weight is posted.

4D model template of Vought F4U Corsair

Discovery Channel: Great Planes - Vought F-4U Corsair.

4D paper airplane:

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Vought F4U Corsair  

model kit paper airplane template and how to make a paper airplane

Vought F4U Corsair 

4D model template of Vought F4U Corsair

Video watch:
(follow video may contain depictions of violence, viewer discretion is advised.)

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​Down Load template: Click "Down Load Template" button and print.  Or copy-paste the “print-out” of 4D template on your graphic program (such as PowerPoint) and add your label. Adjust the size as needed. 

 

​Construction Photo Notes


Check discussion for construction. To see large image: Click picture.

 
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4D model template of Vought F4U Corsair.

Battle station: Corsair Pacific Warrior Documentary.

The Vought F4U Corsair is an American fighter aircraft that saw service primarily in World War II and the Korean War.

Designed and initially manufactured by Chance Vought, the Corsair was soon in great demand; additional production contracts were given to Goodyear, whose Corsairs were designated FG, and Brewster, designated F3A.

The Corsair was designed and operated as a carrier-based aircraft, and entered service in large numbers with the U.S. Navy in late 1944 and early 1945. It quickly became one of the most capable carrier-based fighter-bombers of World War II. Some Japanese pilots regarded it as the most formidable American fighter of World War II, and its naval aviators achieved an 11:1 kill ratio. Yet early problems with carrier landings and logistics allowed it to be eclipsed as the dominant carrier-based fighter by the Grumman F6F Hellcat, powered by the same Double Wasp engine first flown on the Corsair's first prototype in 1940.

Instead, the Corsair came to and retained prominence in its area of greatest deployment: land-based use by the U.S. Marines.

The Corsair served almost exclusively as a fighter-bomber throughout the Korean War and during the French colonial wars in Indochina and Algeria. In addition to its use by the U.S. and British, the Corsair was also used by the Royal New Zealand Air Force, French Naval Aviation, and other air forces until the 1960s.

From the first prototype delivery to the U.S. Navy in 1940, to final delivery in 1953 to the French, 12,571 F4U Corsairs were manufactured in 16 separate models. Its 1942-53 production run was the longest of any U.S. piston-engined fighter.

Carrier-based fighter-bomber,
First flight:        May 29, 1940,
Introduction:     December 28, 1942
Retired:            1953(United States Navy), 1979(Honduras)   
Production:      12,571 (1942-1953).